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Psychology Courses

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, visit the Office of the Registrar.

 

PSYC-099

Course Level: Graduate

PSYC-105 PSYCHOLOGY: UNDERSTANDING HUMAN BEHAVIOR FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Survey of the social bases of behavior and the individual foundations of group and social behavior. This course emphasizes the concepts and methodologies of psychology in such areas as social development, personality, social psychology, and abnormal behavior, as well as the interaction between the individual and social institutions. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-115 PSYCHOLOGY AS A NATURAL SCIENCE FA5 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Through lectures and discussion, students are introduced to the many experimental questions addressed in psychology, e.g., environmental and genetic factors in behavior, biological bases of behavior, sensations and perception, conditioning and learning, memory and cognition, and drug use and abuse, as well as to the specific methods used in psychological research and the general research approaches used in science. Usually offered every term. Corequisite: PSYC-116. Restriction: completion of the University Mathematics Requirement, or concurrent enrollment in MATH-170 or MATH-211 or STAT-202 or STAT-203.

PSYC-116 PSYCHOLOGY AS A NATURAL SCIENCE LAB FA5 (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Through laboratory experiments and simulations, students are exposed to the various techniques, procedures, and designs used in the study of behavior. Usually offered every term. Corequisite: PSYC-115. Restriction: completion of the University Mathematics Requirement, or concurrent enrollment in MATH-170 or MATH-211 or STAT-202 or STAT-203.

PSYC-194 COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

PSYC-196 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-200 BEHAVIOR PRINCIPLES FA5 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The experimental analysis of behavior (EAOB) systematically relates a behavior's probability to its consequences (reinforcement and punishment). Principles derived from the EAOB are used to explain simple animal learning, stimulus control, behavioral sequences and patterning, verbal and other complex human behavior, and emotion. Issues raised by a behavioral approach to human conduct are discussed. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-205 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The processes of social thinking, such as the attribution of causality and the relation of attitudes to behavior; social influence, such as conformity, obedience, and persuasion; and social relations, including aggression, altruism, prejudice, and attraction. Focus on the individual in social settings. Research methods are emphasized. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-215 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIETY FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Focuses on behavior labeled as abnormal by society. Abnormal behavior as a function of the individual's interaction with social institutions (family, school, legal system, mental-health system, etc.). Introduction to the major concepts, theories, and issues of abnormal psychology. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-220 THE SENSES FA5 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An introductory discussion of why things appear as they do. Investigation of our perceptual experiences--their origins, refinements, interpretations, and applications. Discussion of scientific theory and research on the senses. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: 100-level General Education Foundational Area 5 course.

PSYC-235 THEORIES OF PERSONALITY FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Students explore and critically compare four major approaches to understanding uniqueness in human behavior, emotion, and thought: holistic, dynamic, learning, and trait/biological. Class debates, exercises, and a paper help students use these theories to understand their own and others' personalities. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-240 DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR FA5 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This introduction to psychoactive drugs and their effects includes an overview of general physiology, neurochemistry, and pharmacology as well as a survey of the basic physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral effects of drugs. The course focuses on the etiology of drug use and the factors involved in, and consequences of, drug abuse, addiction and dependence. Critical evaluation of research methodology in drug assessment is stressed. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: 100-level General Education Foundational Area 5 course.

PSYC-294 COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

PSYC-296 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-300 MEMORY AND COGNITION (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course provides an overview of cognitive psychology and addresses attention, pattern recognition, perception, memory, language, and thinking. The so-called higher mental processes are studied through discussion of current empirical research, and through classroom demonstrations and development of pilot projects. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-115.

PSYC-301 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An introduction to the basic tools of research used by psychologists. Includes principles of the scientific method, experimental and correlational research, single-subject research, validity and reliability of measurements, ethical issues, and research reporting. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: PSYC-115 and STAT-202 or STAT-203.

PSYC-310 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Psychologists who work effectively with the legal system combine an understanding of the law with pertinent clinical information to communicate psychological findings in the adjudicative setting. This course focuses on the practice of forensic psychology with an emphasis on the relationship between law and behavioral sciences. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-315 SELF-MANAGEMENT (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Principles of cognitive-behavioral self-control for achievement of personal goals. Self-management research is reviewed in weight loss, studying, self-esteem, giving up smoking, drug addiction, depression, time management, and enjoying oneself. Students conduct self-modification projects in group settings. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-318 FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Concerned primarily with the structure, organization, and function of the human brain and the manner in which it produces thoughts, feelings, movement, perceptions, language, and memories. Explores normal brain functioning as well as neurological disorders. Of particular value to students interested in cognition, psychopathology, neurology/medicine, and linguistics. Usually offered alternate falls (even years). Prerequisite: PSYC-115.

PSYC-320 WOMEN AND MENTAL HEALTH (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course focuses on women's functioning. Includes theories of the personality of women, common adjustment problems faced by women, and emotional problems prevalent in women. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-325 NEUROBIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Includes basic neurophysiology (activation of neurons and communication among cells); the basic organization of the nervous system; the role of the brain in receiving stimuli; and the neurobiology of motivated behavior, learning, and behavior disorders. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: PSYC-115.

PSYC-333 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An exploration of how psychological theories and techniques can minimize unnecessary morbidity and premature mortality. Behavioral, cognitive, and affective targets for primary and secondary prevention efforts are identified from epidemiological theory and research. Ways in which psychological methods can contribute to provision of outpatient and inpatient medical services. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-335 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Classic and contemporary views of religion from a psychological perspective. Review of research methodologies as well as major theorists including Freud, Jung, James, Rizzuto, Erikson, Otto, Girgensohn, Allport, Fromm, and Maslow. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-345 COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course introduces the principles, approaches, and guiding concepts of community psychology, including attention to diversity, action research, prevention, and citizen participation. Community psychology seeks to understand the interrelationship between individual well-being and multiple ecological levels of influence, from families and neighborhoods, to economic conditions and mass media. Community psychologists study these relationships to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address pressing problems in our society, including youth violence, HIV/AIDS, and educational disparities. Students apply and expand their learning of key concepts through service in community-based organizations. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: one introductory and two additional psychology courses.

PSYC-350 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduction to development from infancy through adolescence. Emphasis on theory and research in normal development: genetics, growth, and maturation; sensation and perception; motivation; cognitive and social functioning. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: PSYC-105 or PSYC-115.

PSYC-360 THE EVOLUTION OF BEHAVIOR (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Approaches to the study of animal and human behavior with emphasis on the explanation of these behaviors in light of ecology and evolution. Includes aggression, language, sex differences, intelligence, development, learning, and instinct. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: PSYC-115 or PSYC-105.

PSYC-370 LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Research and theory in animal learning. Covers classical and instrumental conditioning. Ethology and biological constraints on learning. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: PSYC-115.

PSYC-390 INDEPENDENT READING COURSE IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Permission: instructor and department chair.

PSYC-394 COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

PSYC-396 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-410 ADVANCED FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course is organized around reading primary sources in important areas of forensic psychology including torture, predatory sexual behaviors, bullying, and battering, among others. Students gain an in-depth exposure to and increased understanding of Axis II, Cluster B personality disorders, as described in the DSM-IV, and have extensive exposure to the most scientific research on these phenomena. Meets with PSYC-610. Usually offered every spring.

PSYC-414 INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Application of psychological principles to the field of work. Includes selection, training, evaluation, leadership, motivation, decision making, job attitudes and satisfaction, organizational structure and theory, and human factors. Meets with PSYC-614. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: two psychology courses and one statistics course.

PSYC-420 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Study of adolescence as a period of transition. Includes research and theory on hormonal, emotional, social, and cognitive development in adolescence. The influence of peer pressure, need for self-individuation, and problems of adolescence are also considered. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-105.

PSYC-425 PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING DISORDERS AND OBESITY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The study of theory, research, diagnosis and treatment as it pertains to nutrition, dieting, exercise, body image, obesity, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-105 or PSYC-115.

PSYC-430 HUMAN SEXUAL BEHAVIOR (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Basic physiological knowledge, sex education, sexual myths, premarital and marital sexual behavior, homosexuality, pornography, etc. Emphasis on psychological aspects of sex and sexuality. Usually offered every fall.

PSYC-433 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: SOCIAL SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY RESEARCH (4)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Introduces basic principles of psychological measurement and research design. Explains methods of identifying and developing reliable and valid psychological tests and behavioral observation systems. Reviews experimental and correlational research designs, as applied to social science areas of psychology (e.g. psychotherapy outcome research). Usually offered every term. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-440 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO CLINICAL ISSUES (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines applications of social psychology to clinical psychology. Includes using social psychology to understand disorders such as depression; applying social psychology to treatment issues, such as persuading people to remain in therapy; and considering diagnosis as a problem in social cognition. Usually offered alternate springs (even years). Prerequisite: PSYC-205.

PSYC-450 PSYCHOLOGY OF WELL-BEING (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An overview of the theory, research, and applications in the psychology of well-being. Includes self-esteem, relationships and intimacy, competence and achievement, crisis and loss, and meaning and values in life. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: PSYC-105 or PSYC-115.

PSYC-468 ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course explores the art and science of alternative (also known as integrative, complementary, or holistic) medicine. It investigates the scientific, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of healing, including scientific research as well as historical and global healing traditions. The modern perspective of mind-body-spirit healing is considered in context with specific alternative therapies, including acupuncture, meditation, herbal and homeopathic medicine, bio-energy healing, psychotherapy, nutrition, chiropractic, and more. Meets with PSYC-668. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-470 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The focus is on two major activities of clinical psychologists: assessment and clinical intervention (psychotherapy and program models). Also includes the functions, history, training, and ethics of the profession. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: PSYC-105 or PSYC-115, and either PSYC-215 or PSYC-230.

PSYC-480 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Data and research methods in core areas of psychology. Review of experimental design. Individual and group experiments. Usually offered alternate springs. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-490 INDEPENDENT STUDY PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Permission: instructor.

PSYC-491 INTERNSHIP (1-3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Practical experience in a professional setting in the metropolitan area for advanced psychology majors. Permission: instructor and department chair.

PSYC-494 COMMUNITY SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

PSYC-496 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-497 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Each section is an intensive course in a specialized area of psychology, such as community psychology, social and clinical judgement, and psychology of infancy. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: three psychology courses and junior standing. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-498 SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be repeated for credit. Students participate in research under the supervision of individual faculty (which should be arranged before enrolling). The proposal, analysis, and conclusions of this research are discussed among other students as well as with departmental faculty. Honors students are required to take two semesters. Usually offered every term. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-502 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Philosophical and scientific background of modern psychology and contemporary problems of theory construction. Usually offered alternate falls.

PSYC-515 PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

This course focuses on how we process music in general, both at micro and macro levels. The course explores neural, perceptual, cognitive, as well as social and clinical aspects of both listening to and performing music. Topics discussed include the workings of the brain, comparisons with language, memory for music, development of musicality, individual differences, performance anxiety, and music therapy. Meets with PERF-515. Prerequisite: three psychology courses. Note: theoretical or practical music experience required.

PSYC-518 ADVANCED HUMAN NEUROPSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Explores the empirical, anatomical, and theoretical aspects of clinical and cognitive human neuropsychology. Includes object and face recognition; spatial perception; voluntary action; language (oral, writing, and reading comprehension, word and sentence processing, speech production); problem-solving and calculation; memory; and dysfunctions (i.e., agnosias, apraxias, amnesias, and aphasias) illustrated with clinical case studies. Usually offered alternate springs (odd years). Permission: instructor.

PSYC-521 ETHNIC AND MINORITY ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

A review of ethnic and minority issues as they relate to testing, psychotherapy, research, and other aspects of scientific and professional psychology. Usually offered alternate falls.

PSYC-530 CONDITIONING AND LEARNING (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Advanced treatment of the basic principles, theory, and experimental literature of contemporary operant and Pavlovian conditioning. The reinforcement variables responsible for the acquisition and maintenance of the stimulus control of behavior and incentive-motivation are studied. These variables are central to understanding changes in behavior resulting from past experience. The emphasis is on basic principles and research in this area, although practical applications, such as animal models of drug abuse, are also discussed. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-200 or PSYC-370.

PSYC-533 COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

This seminar examines critically the cognitive revolution in behavior therapy. We review the theoretical basis, clinical procedures, and empirical status of several major forms of cognitive behavior therapy, which share the premise that maladaptive thinking is at the core of psychological distress. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-540 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Psychological factors in human social behavior. Examination of research literature with emphasis on design and methodology. Theoretical problems in social behavior and current trends in experimentation. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-545 PSYCHOLOGY OF SEX SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Examines the ways that the behavior of males and females are comparable by examining the psychological literature to understand what biological and social-cultural factors influence these behaviors. Considers what conclusions can be drawn from the existing data and what types of research should be done to further knowledge of gender issues. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-555 IMPROVING HUMAN SERVICES (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

To measure, monitor, and maximize the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of mental health treatment, substance abuse programs, and other human services, concrete strategies are presented for collecting, analyzing, presenting and using data on resources, procedures, processes, and outcomes. Readings are augmented with case studies and findings from evaluations by the faculty and students. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: PSYC-105 and STAT-202 or STAT-203.

PSYC-590 INDEPENDENT READING COURSE IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Permission: instructor and department chair.

PSYC-596 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-597 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Each section is an intensive course in a specialized area of psychology. Usually offered every term. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-598 SEMINAR IN BEHAVIOR, COGNITION, AND NEUROSCIENCE (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Examination of neuroscience issues through articles, texts, and group discussion. The course extends the foundations established in the core curriculum and demonstrates their application to cutting edge research. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-600 ADVANCED MEMORY AND COGNITION (3)

Course Level: Graduate

After a short review of the field in general this course focuses on specific issues, both theoretical and applied. Areas covered include attention, perception, language and thinking. Usually offered every spring.

PSYC-601 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Anatomical and physiological substrata of behavior. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: two psychology courses.

PSYC-605 ADVANCED PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Examines contemporary research in personality psychology, focusing on expectancies, motivation, self-concept, and genetic and environmental influences on personality development. Gender and cultural issues are considered, as are applications of personality psychology in the study of mental and physical health. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-610 ADVANCED FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course is organized around reading primary sources in important areas of forensic psychology including torture, predatory sexual behaviors, bullying, and battering, among others. Students gain an in-depth exposure to and increased understanding of Axis II, Cluster B personality disorders, as described in the DSM-IV, and have extensive exposure to the most scientific research on these phenomena. Meets with PSYC-410. Usually offered every spring.

PSYC-613 NEUROPHARMACOLOGY: THE BIOCHEMISTRY OF BEHAVIOR (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Following an overview of central nervous system physiology, this class gives a detailed examination of the range of neurotransmitters involved in neural communication and modulation. Each neurotransmitter is described in the context of its biochemistry, distribution, pharmacology, and involvement in both normal and abnormal behavior. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-614 INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Application of psychological principles to the field of work. Includes selection, training, evaluation, leadership, motivation, decision making, job attitudes and satisfaction, organizational structure and theory, and human factors. Meets with PSYC-414. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: two psychology courses and one statistics course.

PSYC-618 PRINCIPLES OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Introduces theoretical and empirical principles of neuropsychological assessment. Emphasis on developing skills of behavioral and cognitive observation coupled with an understanding of the underlying functional organization of the human nervous system. Students study representative tests and, in the laboratory and/or in supervised clinical settings, practice their administration, scoring, and interpretation. Prerequisite: PSYC-518 and PSYC-633. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-622 STRESS, COPING, AND EMOTION (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course introduces students to the theory, methods, and applications of stress and coping research, while allowing them to understand and manage their own experiences of stress. Reading assignments and lectures address the nature of psychological stress, its relation to appraisals, coping, and emotion, and the specific methodological challenges of studying stress and coping. It includes models of stress responses, personality, gender, and culture. Personal growth, stress and health, depression, and clinical interventions are also discussed. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-630 PSYCHOTHERAPY: THEORY, RESEARCH, AND PRACTICE (3)

Course Level: Graduate

A survey of research literature relevant to the therapist, the client, the relationship and process of psychotherapy. Major theoretical orientations and techniques are reviewed. Usually offered every fall.

PSYC-633 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT I (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Introduces students to basic principles of psychological assessment. Emphasizes conceptual issues much more than practical applications, though substantive psychological research is used to illustrate the concepts. Helps students learn how to critically evaluate, and contribute to, knowledge regarding measurement of psychological functioning. Usually offered every fall.

PSYC-650 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH (3)

Course Level: Graduate

An in-depth examination of experimental design and methods of conducting research in clinical, social, experimental, and bio-psychology. Usually offered every fall.

PSYC-651 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY: THEORY AND RESEARCH (3)

Course Level: Graduate

In this seminar students discuss the theoretical and empirical underpinning of psychopathology. While it is important to know the diagnostic criteria for each disorder, it is more important to have an understanding of the relationship between disorders and how the overlap influences the field of psychopathology. The development of DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and the theory behind psychopathological classification provides the background for understanding the etiology of adult disorders. Current research that addresses the classification and treatment of adult disorders is also covered. Usually offered every spring.

PSYC-652 ASSESSMENT OF INTELLECTUAL FUNCTION AND PERSONALITY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Introduction to administration and interpretation of WAIS-III, MMPI-II, and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Also includes integration across tests, holistic case conceptualization, and report writing. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: PSYC-551 and PSYC-633. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-654 ADVANCED ASSESSMENT: INTEGRATIVE BATTERY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This advanced testing course builds on PSYC-633 and PSYC-652. Students are trained to administer batteries of tests, score them, and write reports that integrate the findings from the tests. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: PSYC-633 and PSYC-652.

PSYC-660 ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Current theoretical and research issues in developmental psychology. Areas of emphasis include socialization, affective development, and cognitive development. Students, from their readings and discussion, critically analyze existing data and formulate questions for further investigation. Usually offered alternate falls.

PSYC-668 ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course explores the art and science of alternative (also known as integrative, complementary, or holistic) medicine. It investigates the scientific, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of healing, including scientific research as well as historical and global healing traditions. The modern perspective of mind-body-spirit healing is considered in context with specific alternative therapies, including acupuncture, meditation, herbal and homeopathic medicine, bio-energy healing, psychotherapy, nutrition, chiropractic, and more. Meets with PSYC-468. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-670 BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Acquaints students with psychological theory, research, and practical techniques for maintaining health, preventing dysfunctions, and remediating health problems. Includes cognitive-behavioral techniques for cardiovascular risk reduction (smoking, obesity, stress, diet), exercise enhancement, time management, adherence to medical regimens, and problems with nervous, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal systems. Restriction: graduate psychology program.

PSYC-680 EXPERIENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICUM I (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Interviewing techniques and practice in skills related to counseling psychotherapy by systematic exposure to critical elements in interviews through supervision and guided observation. Usually offered every fall. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-681 EXPERIENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICUM II (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Continuation of PSYC-680. Usually offered every spring. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-690 INDEPENDENT STUDY PROJECT IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and department chair.

PSYC-691 INTERNSHIP (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor and department chair.

PSYC-696 SELECTED TOPICS: NON-RECURRING (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

PSYC-698 DIRECTED RESEARCH (3-6)

Course Level: Graduate

May be repeated for credit. May not be used in place of PSYC-796, PSYC-797, PSYC-798, or PSYC-799. Usually offered every term.

PSYC-710 COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY PRACTICUM I (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Review of behavior therapy and cognitive-behavioral techniques. Supervision and co-therapy in application of techniques. Usually offered every fall. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Clinical Psychology (PhD).

PSYC-711 COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY PRACTICUM II (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Review of behavior therapy and cognitive-behavioral techniques. Supervision and co-therapy in application of techniques. Usually offered every spring. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Clinical Psychology (PhD).

PSYC-715 SUPERVISION AND CONSULTATION (1)

Course Level: Graduate

An overview of common models of supervision and consultation in psychology with an emphasis on the evidence-based variables contributing to effective supervision and consulting relationships. The course explores the difference between supervisor and supervisee and consultant and consultee while emphasizing awareness of ethical issues and reasoning. Usually offered alternate springs.

PSYC-791 PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICUM I (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Usually offered every fall. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-792 PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY PRACTICUM II (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Usually offered every spring. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Permission: instructor.

PSYC-793 ADVANCED BEHAVIORAL AND COGNITIVE THERAPIES PRACTICUM I (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Provides advanced training in behavioral and cognitive therapies. Students learn Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and various disorder specific interventions, (e.g., Prolonged Exposure for PTSD, Interoceptive Exposure for panic disorder), both in the classroom and while providing treatment to adult outpatients. Additional activities include report writing, case presentation, and instructor-led group consultation with peers. Usually offered alternate springs. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Restriction: Clinical Psychology (PhD). Permission: instructor.

PSYC-794 ADVANCED BEHAVIORAL AND COGNITIVE THERAPIES PRACTICUM II (3

Course Level: Graduate

Continuation of PSYC-793. Provides advanced training in behavioral and cognitive therapies. Students learn Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and various disorder specific interventions, (e.g., Prolonged Exposure for PTSD, Interoceptive Exposure for panic disorder), both in the classroom and while providing treatment to adult outpatients. Additional activities include report writing, case presentation, and instructor-led group consultation with peers. Usually offered alternate falls. Grading: Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: PSYC-793. Restriction: Clinical Psychology (PhD). Permission: instructor.

PSYC-796 MASTER'S THESIS SEMINAR (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only.

PSYC-797 MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (1-3)

Course Level: Graduate

Grading: SP/UP only.

PSYC-799 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION RESEARCH (1-9)

Course Level: Graduate

Grading: Pass/Fail only.

PSYC-898 DOCTORAL CONTINUING ENROLLMENT (1-9)

Course Level: Graduate

May be taken by doctoral students completing coursework, exams or proposals in preparation for advancement to candidacy. It is a 1-9 credit course that can be repeated once and may be taken with or without regular coursework. Tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. The course is graded SP/UP and students must have the approval of their Program Director. Academic load will be determined by total enrolled credits for the semester. This course may not be used to establish full-time status for merit aid except for students with a half-time appointment who have an approved plan to distribute a total of 18 credits over one calendar year (6 credits during Fall, Spring and Summer semesters). Grading: SP/UP only. Restriction: PhD students. Permission: program director.

PSYC-899 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Course Level: Graduate

May be taken by doctoral students who are advanced to candidacy with the approval of the faculty supervising the dissertation (or designee). It is a 9 credit course, but tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. The course is graded SP/UP and students will be deemed full-time. The Office of the Registrar must be notified when a student has advanced to candidacy. Grading: SP/UP only. Restriction: doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy. Permission: program director.


Psychology Honors Program Requirements 

  1. An advanced research methods course (PSYC-433 or PSYC-480) with a B- or better.
  2. One 500 level course. Independent Reading does not count.
  3. One Honors Colloquium or an interdisciplinary Science Honors Course with a grade of C or better or a standing course which is designated as an honors course by the psychology department. The following two courses will be accepted as Honors Courses: PSYC-497 Fall 2017 “Drugs in America,” taught by Dr. Anthony Riley and PSYC-497 Spring 2018 “Stereotyping and Prejudice” taught by Dr. Laura Duval.
  4. An Honors Capstone Independent Research Study supervised by a full time faculty member and approved by the director of the undergraduate program (Take PSYC-498). This research study cannot be the same study developed in a research course. It can, however, be a substantial expansion of that study.
  5. Typically students apply to the program in their sophomore year (exceptions can be made for a start in the junior year, (e.g. transfer students).
  6. After consulting with a chosen capstone advisor, applicants should write a short summary of their proposed study which will be reviewed by the director of the undergraduate program and the UCC.
  7. To enter the Honors Program, a student must have a GPA of at least 3.50 at the time of application to the program. To continue in the Honors Program beyond Junior year, the student must have at least a 3.67 GPA at the end of Junior year.
  8. Students can be in both the university and the departmental honors program.
  9. $300 per honors student is available to reimburse students for research experiences. Save the receipts. 

Contact Dr. James Gray at 202-885-1716 or jgray@american.edu for details.